Saturday, 12 October 2019

Wednesday night's set lists at The Habit, York

Image result for the habit, york
Ron Elderly: -
Just My Imagination
Lola


Da Elderly: -
Things We Said Today
I Don't Want To Talk About It


The Elderly Brothers: -
Bring It On Home To Me
Mailman, Bring Me No More Blues
When Will I Be Loved
Love Hurts
I Saw Her Standing There


What a change from last week! The place was packed from the start with players and punters. Late coming players had to be turned away. There were one or two debuts from young lads and lasses, with fine performances all round, in particular a lad there with his dad......he had only been playing guitar for 12 months but you'd never have guessed and his deep baritone belied his years. The Elderlys closed the show with the assistance of local harmonica wizard Tim on the first two numbers.

Wednesday, 9 October 2019

JD Salinger exhibition of photographs, letters and notebooks

Related image
JD Salinger exhibition to unveil photographs, letters and notebooks
New York Public Library exhibit will show a mix of personal and literary effects, and will run for three months

Tom McCarthy
The Guardian
Mon 7 Oct 2019

When the writer JD Salinger died in 2010, his literary agent issued a statement saying that “in keeping with his lifelong, uncompromising desire to protect and defend his privacy, there will be no service”.

That was then. Next week, the curtain of privacy behind which Salinger carefully guarded his personal life will be lowered further, with a major exhibition at the New York Public Library.

The exhibit, which will be free to the public and is scheduled to run for three months, will present a mix of personal and literary effects, ranging from the original typescript of The Catcher in the Rye, revised by the author, to a bookcase from Salinger’s bedroom filled with books from his personal library.

The exhibit was organized by Salinger’s son Matt Salinger, widow Colleen Salinger and the library’s special collections department.
Image result for JD Salinger graPHIc
“He was a famously private man who shared his work with millions but his life and non-published thoughts with less than a handful of people, including me,” Matt Salinger said in a statement.

“But I’ve learned that while he may have only fathered two children there are a great, great many readers out there who have their own rather profound relationships with him, through his work, and who have long wanted an opportunity to get to know him better.”

The exhibit will also include:
  • Photographs from Salinger’s childhood, youth and later life, including from his second world war service in the US army and time as entertainment director on the cruise ship MS Kungsholm in 1941
  • Correspondence between Salinger’s friends, fellow soldiers and authors and editors including William Shawn, William Maxwell and Ernest Hemingway
  • Items from the writer’s childhood, including a bowl he made at summer camp when he was about 10 and kept his whole life
  • Notebooks, passports, honorable discharge papers from the army in which he identified his civilian occupation as “playwright, author”, and personal artifacts such as pipes, eyeglasses and a wrist watch
  • One of the author’s two typewriters, his film projector and numerous other personal effects
Salinger ceased publishing in the 1960s and refused with rare exceptions press requests and the enthusiastic advances of fans, some of whom went looking for him in his rural New Hampshire home.
Related image
The Catcher in the Rye, published as a novel in 1951, has sold tens of millions of copies. The dyspeptic teenage protagonist of the novel, Holden Caulfield, spends a couple of days wandering New York City but does not make it to the library.

The exhibition will also include a previously undisclosed self-description from a 1982 legal document.

“I am a professional short-story writer and novelist,” the description reads. “I write fiction and only fiction. For more than 30 years, I have lived and done my work in rural New Hampshire. I was married here and my two children were raised here … I have been writing fiction rather passionately, singlemindedly, perhaps insatiably, since I was 15 or so.

“… I positively rejoice to imagine that, sooner or later, the finished product safely goes to the ideal private reader, alive or dead or yet unborn, male or female or possibly neither.”



Sunday, 6 October 2019

Highway 61 Revisited by Jessica Lange


Mississippi

Mississippi

Iowa

Minnesota

New Orleans

Minnesota

Arkansas

Mississippi

Missouri

Minnesota

US actress Jessica Lange poses on July 9, 2010 in front of her black and white work, at the Ateliers de l'Image, in Saint-Remy de Provence, southern France. Photo: Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images.

“These photographs are a chronicle of what remains and what has disappeared. It has a long memory, Highway 61.” — Jessica Lange

Renowned actress and photographer Jessica Lange was raised in Northern Minnesota and has travelled the length of Highway 61 countless times since her childhood and throughout her life. This storied route originates at the Canadian border in Minnesota and runs along the great Mississippi River through the American Midwest and South, rolling through eight states, down to New Orleans.

With more than 80 stunning tritone photographs, Lange’s Highway 61 reveals her deep connection to this iconic route, and presents that which she has long held dear along its way. This is a tale of our shared national heritage as seen by one of the most talented artists of her generation.

https://news.artnet.com/exhibitions/jessica-lange-highway-61-1669138


‘Highway 61’: Jessica Lange’s new photography book explores her midwestern roots
The Oscar-winning actress uses the same visceral method she uses on stage to take an honest and stripped-bare look at roadside reality.

Ted Loos 
The Independent
5 October 2019

When Jessica Lange finally admits that her driving is a bit unpredictable it comes as a relief. I was afraid to bring it up from the passenger seat. “My kids used to say, ‘Mom, pick a lane!’” the two-time Oscar winner says, chuckling.

On a day with silvery light coming through clouds and Lake Superior to our right, she is piloting us northward from Duluth, on Highway 61. We have a perfect car for an August road trip: her green 1967 Mercedes-Benz 250S, heavy as a tank and with seat belts of questionable functionality. But Lange exudes confidence and so I don’t worry too much. She knows where she is going.

For her, a Minnesota native who summers in what she calls a cabin an hour or so away, Highway 61 is more than a conveyance; it is a creative wellspring that dates back to her childhood.

In fact, this is Lange’s third trip along the route this summer, towards towns with names like Castle Danger and Beaver Bay, past dense stands of trees and signs for smoked fish and homemade pies. The road itself is the subject of her latest book of photographs Highway 61 which came out at the beginning of this month.

Inside, the 84 black-and-white photographs document all manner of life along 61, which runs – first as a state road, then for most of its route as a US highway – from the Canadian border down to New Orleans, a city where she lived and owned a home for a time. She was born in the town of Cloquet, Minnesota, and the route was a central artery for her family, but the book also chronicles the changes she has witnessed – stretches of the road that she describes as “empty, forlorn, as if in mourning for what has gone missing”.

It’s not that Lange, 70, who starred in Tootsie, Grey Gardens and dozens of other movies and TV shows, has given up acting. Her latest production from Ryan Murphy – who kept her busy through many seasons of American Horror Story, which earned her two of her three Emmys – is The Politician, which debuted on Netflix last Friday.

But photography is much more than a hobby for her, as I discover over our four-hour road trip. Wherever we stop, she pauses to take photographs.

‘It’s expressive, emotional street photography’

She started taking pictures seriously in the 1990s, when her partner at the time, playwright and actor Sam Shepard, came back from a trip to Germany with a Leica as a gift. She saw it as a way to take high-quality pictures of their two children, and her practice grew from there.

Lange, although now based in New York, has spent time over the last six years documenting all eight states where Highway 61 unfolds.

In the book’s afterword, Lange writes about how her first album purchase was Highway 61 Revisited, released in 1965 by Bob Dylan, a fellow Minnesotan. When she left home at 18, she hit the road, “headed south out of town”, she writes, “on my way to Europe and beyond, the start of a new life”.


‘It’s not a tourist view. She gets close to her subjects’

The photographs themselves are grainy, suffused with intense light and shadow, capturing small moments featuring people, road signs, horizons, carnivals, diners. The book’s cover has one of her most striking images, an African American child looking right at the camera with an intense gaze. “It’s expressive, emotional street photography,” says veteran dealer Howard Greenberg, who is giving Lange a show of the Highway 61 images from 21 November to 18 January in his New York gallery. “It’s not a tourist view. She gets close to her subjects.”

At first glance, Highway 61 may evoke the work of William Eggleston and Robert Frank, who died this month: they are two photographers Lange has known personally and admired. “Who hasn’t he influenced?” she says of Frank.

‘I never use a flash or carry lights or anything’

But her favourite practitioner is someone less famous, Czech photographer Josef Koudelka, noted for his work with the Magnum agency and high-contrast, black-and-white images, as in his seminal Gypsies series.

“I never use a flash or carry lights or anything,” Lange says when we stop for lunch and a beer in the town of Beaver Bay. A few people register that a famous person is in their midst, but Lange is unfazed. “I never crop,” Lange adds. “I think it’s a conceit. I always loved that Henri Cartier-Bresson showed you the whole image.”

Lange reads up on photography – she says she has been reading Roland Barthes’ Camera Lucida just this week – but her take on the medium is more instinctual than theoretical. “It’s storytelling,” Lange says.

Sarah Paulson, her co-star from American Horror Story and a close friend, lives in Los Angeles with four of Lange’s images on the walls and is soon getting a fifth. “When you’re seeing through Jessica’s lens, it’s immediate and feels visceral,” Paulson says. “It’s the same alchemy that makes her so extraordinarily powerful as an actress.”

Anne Morin, whose company, diChroma Photography, produces travelling photography exhibitions, met Lange through Greenberg and became enough of a fan to send her work on tour. Lange can be “as quick as Garry Winogrand,” Morin says. It’s true. When we arrive at Black Beach Park in Silver Bay – so named for its tiny black stones – Lange at first takes a few pictures of moody Lake Superior, but she seems uninspired by the landscape. It’s too generic.

After we greet a mother and two children who have braved the lake’s cold water for a dip, her camera is suddenly up and she snaps several pictures of the family as they walk away, cloaked in towels. “The boy turned as I was taking it, and it produced a great shape,” she says.

Photography, and what it captures, has potency for Lange, who recounts a moment when she was 5 or 6, looking through a box of photos in her grandparents’ attic. “One man was looking directly into the camera, and his gaze was so arresting to me as a little girl,” she recalls. “And I thought, ‘I’m connecting to him somehow.’ That’s the power of photography.”
‘What’s wonderful is the anonymity of it’

At the University of Minnesota, photography accidentally ended up in her curriculum when she couldn’t get into a painting class. She met a group of photographers through her professors there, including Daniel Seymour and Paco Grande. She married Grande in 1970, but not before ditching school to travel to Europe with them, including to Paris during the May 1968 protests.

‘You’re an actress, therefore you’re not considered a photographer. So you’re an actress who photographs. It’s a kind of mindless categorising’

Once she moved to New York, she found herself living in a loft on the Bowery with Robert Frank (Seymour’s collaborator in a 1972 documentary about the Rolling Stones on tour). She recalls Frank taking stills of her for a film she was working on at the time. But she herself wasn’t taking photographs yet. That would have to wait until after her movie career took off, starting with King Kong (1976).

As it turns out, one of the holdovers from her life in that era is the car we are driving in today, originally owned by director Milos Forman, who died last year. The Mercedes was a gift from Mikhail Baryshnikov, Lange’s partner of six years (it ended in 1982) and the father of the first of her three children.

Baryshnikov gave her the Mercedes after obtaining it from Forman, who used it to flee the 1968 Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia. Somehow, his government ID from the time remained in the glove compartment, in a pink case. I almost don’t believe it until I have it in my hand. “He was so handsome,” she says.

The proximity of someone else’s fame brings up the topic of how someone as well known as Lange can be a street photographer, a genre that relies on the camera-wielder being unobtrusive. But as I witness, not everyone recognises Lange, at least at first, and by the time they do, she has already snapped the picture.

“What’s wonderful is the anonymity of it,” Lange tells me of switching sides from the object of the camera’s gaze to the director of it. “Such a relief”. In the age of Instagram, when “everyone is a photographer,” as she puts it, it’s a treat for her to take control of the lens. It’s a break from fretting that someone is taking her picture in a supermarket: “I don’t have to worry about being absurd.”

Once we are heading back south to Duluth, I wonder, given her success as an actor, exactly how seriously she wants to be taken as a photographer. “You know how this works,” she says, sounding not bitter but realistic. “You’re an actress, therefore you’re not considered a photographer. So you’re an actress who photographs. It’s a kind of mindless categorising; if you’re one thing, you can’t be another.”

But Midwestern optimism, and what I glean is one of Lange’s core personality traits – what Paulson calls her sense of “freedom and abandon” – wins the day, as the clouds actually part for the return home. “I’ve got a day job,” she says, and laughs again. “I just love taking photographs. That’s the only reason I do it.”

© New York Times

Friday, 4 October 2019

Wednesday night's set lists at The Habit, York


Ron Elderly: -
As Tears Go By
Wild Horses
Sweet Virginia
Just My Imagination
Lola
Suspicious Minds
The River
Promises
You Better Move On


Da Elderly: -
In The Morning Light
I'm Just A Loser
Like A Hurricane
Out On The Weekend
Tell Me Why
Heart Of Gold
Never Let Her Slip Away
You've Got A Friend
You're Sixty


The Elderly Brothers: -
Mailman, Bring Me No More Blues
Love Hurts
Then I Kissed Her
You Got It
Let It Be Me
I Saw Her Standing There


It was the quietest night for ages, particularly for players. Until a young chap came in at around 11:15, there was just me, Ron and host Simon at the mic. There weren't too many punters out either - maybe it was the Euro Footy games, certainly wasn't the weather, but those who did turn out were supportive and really enjoyed themselves. We took turns to play 3-song sets to fill up the night. I was surprised when two couples got up to dance to my pensioners' take on Johnny Burnette's You're Sixteen. After the young lad played his set, The Elderly Brothers finished off the show - I Saw Her Standing There bringing out the dancers again. Ron and I then played requests unplugged until closing time. Despite the poor turnout I think everyone had a good time, which is why we do this in the first place.

Thursday, 3 October 2019

Bob Dylan: sources for The Beaten Path

Touch of Evil

Some enterprising soul has put together a list of 'inspirations' for Dylan's The Beaten Path series of paintings:

https://www.pinterest.co.uk/scottwarmuth/a-look-at-film-sources-in-bob-dylans-the-beaten-pa/

Touch of Evil

Circa 1952 home movie of Beany’s Drive-In in Long Beach, California

The Set-Up

Top one is, of course, from Touch of Evil; the bottom is from Robert Wise's The Set-Up. Bob has great taste. Click the link: there are many, many more...

Wednesday, 2 October 2019

Nat King Cole: Hittin' The Ramp - the early years


Straighten Up and Fly Right: Resonance Collects Nat “King” Cole’s Earliest Years on New Box Set

Joe Marchese
The Second Disc
22 July 2019

The career of Nat “King” Cole has been exceedingly well-represented in the CD era, whether via numerous, expanded original album reissues or the hefty box sets released by the Bear Family and Mosaic labels. But one period of King Cole’s career has been rather overlooked: the recordings he made prior to signing with Capitol Records, the label with which he would spend more than two decades. Now, Resonance Records is addressing that situation with a remarkable, comprehensive new box set that ranks as the jazz label’s most ambitious project yet. Hittin’ the Ramp: The Early Years (1936-1943) is a 7-CD or 10-LP box set exploring that all-but-unknown period of the artist’s career with previously unreleased and new-to-commercial-release rarities and tracks culled from transcription discs and private collectors’ sources. It’s due from Resonance on November 1 in both formats. (Dig that sensational cover designed by John Sellards!)

Hittin’ the Ramp: The Early Years (1936-1943) has been produced in association with the Cole Estate – the latest release in a centennial year celebration that has also seen the release from Universal Music of International Nat King Cole and Ultimate Nat King Cole as well as TJL Productions’ 3-CD collection Nat King Cole: Favorites (a companion to the public television broadcast of the new special My Music: Nat King Cole’s Greatest Songs). The set is co-produced by noted jazz and vocal pop historian Will Friedwald (a Grammy nominee for his liner notes to 1992’s The Complete Capitol Recordings of The Nat King Cole Trio) who points out, “”At the height of his fame in the 1950s and ’60s, Nat King Cole (1919-1965) was primarily known as a popular singer — the biggest-selling artist of his generation, no less — who occasionally played piano. By that point, only a few older fans and critics remembered that he had been one of the greatest pianists in the whole history of American music, a true spiritual descendent of Earl ‘Fatha’ Hines and Art Tatum, and himself a huge inspiration for Oscar Peterson, George Shearing, Erroll Garner, and many others.”

Legendary vocalist Johnny Mathis (whose own catalogue is currently being reissued by Second Disc Records and Real Gone Music) is among those interviewed for the set. He concurs with Friedwald’s opinion, and shares, “As a young boy, studying the art of vocalizing, Nat was everything I needed. All I did was listen and learn…And then I want [people] to remember that he also, also, also played the piano. Please, please, please remember that. Even as gigantic as a pianist as he was as a vocalist.”

The nearly 200 tracks on Hittin’ the Ramp focus on the earliest recordings featuring The King Cole Trio, emphasizing Cole’s fertile creative partnership with guitarist Oscar Moore. It all begins, however, with Nat’s pair of sides recorded with his brother Eddie for Decca in 1936 as a teenaged piano prodigy. You’ll then hear Cole’s first versions of future standards “Sweet Lorraine” and “Straighten Up and Fly Right” as well as rare recordings (including as sideman and accompanist) for the Decca, Ammor, Excelsior, Premier, Mercury, and Philo labels (including a session for the latter, started by Norman Granz during the 1942 Musicians Union recording ban, with the great saxophonist Lester Young). The box includes numerous radio transcriptions and war-era recordings for Armed Forces Radio Service.



It also contains dozens of transcriptions, mainly by the trio, cut by Standard, Davis and Schwegler, and MacGregor for servicing to radio stations, as well as wartime recordings produced for American servicemen by the Armed Forces Radio Service. Among the rarest items on the box set are performances never known to exist previously such as a privately-recorded song, “The Romany Room is Jumping” (in tribute to the Washington, DC club in which the Trio played), a transcription of “Trompin’,” and a 1940 Trio reading of Trummy Young’s “Watcha Know Joe.” Friedwald is quoted in the press release: “Although nothing on this package can be described as ‘common,’ these are some of the rarest Cole items known to exist.”

He continues, “Just in time for his centennial, we cover this quintessential American artist from his very first stirrings at the start of the swing era to the very precipice of universal fame during World War Two, with dozens of fascinating detours along the way. This, then, is the incredible but true origin story of a sound and a career that would change the world.”

Indeed, Hittin’ the Ramp, produced by Resonance’s Zev Feldman, Friedwald, Berg, Matt Lutthans (who also remastered), and Jordan Taylor, and executive produced by Resonance’s George Klabin, chronicles the ground floor of an extraordinary career that would not only see Cole rack up over 150 chart entries and sales of over 50 million records during his lifetime, but also break significant barriers for African-American artists.

This essential box set is available now for pre-order from Resonance Records. You can peruse the track listing and pre-order links below!

Nat “King” Cole, Hittin’ the Ramp: The Early Years (1936-1943) (Resonance Records, 2019)


7CD Track Listing:

DISC 1
Honey Hush (Nat Cole) 2:52
Stompin’ at the Panama (Skoller’s Shuffle) (Nat Cole) 2:59
Bedtime (Sleepy Moan) (Nat Cole) 2:54
Thunder (Nat Cole) 2:50
Mutiny in the Nursery (Johnny Mercer) 2:52
D.R. Jones (Harold Rome) 3:10
The Sheik of Araby (Ted Snyder, Francis Wheeler, Harry B. Smith) 2:17
The Blue Danube (Johan Strauss II) 2:50
Button, Button (Clay A. Boland, Bickley ‘Bix’ Reichner) 2:52
Jingle Bells (J.S. Pierpont) 2:34
Swanee River (Stephen Foster) 2:28
With Plenty of Money and You (Harry Warren, Al Dubin) 2:15
Don’t Blame Me ((Jimmy McHugh, Dorothy Fields) 2:26
Lullaby in Rhythm (Edgar Sampson, Walter Hirsch, Clarence Profit, Benny Goodman) 2:48
Dark Rapture (Edgar Sampson, Manny Kurtz, Benny Goodman) 3:13
The Wiggly Walk (Al Jacobs, Dave Oppenheim, Jack Palmer) 2:52
Flea Hop (Al Jacobs, Dave Oppenheim, Jack Palmer) 2:43
Chopsticks (Arthur De Lulli) 2:44
Patty Cake, Patty Cake (Thomas ‘Fats’ Waller, Andy Razaf, J. C. Johnson) 2:43
Blue Skies (Irving Berlin) 2:09
Liza (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin, Gus Kahn) 2:58
Three Blind Mice (Traditional) 2:08
Caravan (Duke Ellington, Juan Tizol, Irving Mills) 2:17
There’s No Anesthetic for Love (Marshall Walker) 3:15
Dixie Jamboree (Lyle Griffin, Charles Callender) 3:04
Ta-De-Ah (Betty Johnson, Charlie Bourne) 2:39
Riffin’ at the Bar-B-Q (Nat Cole) 2:05
Harlem Swing (Bonnie Lake) 2:30
I Lost Control of Myself (Irwin ‘Hap’ Kaufman, Nat Cole) 3:16

DISC 2
The Land of Make Believe (Betty Johnson, Charlie Bourne) 2:52
That Please-Be-Mine-Able Feeling (Reginald Sloan) 2:15
Dancing in the Street (Arthur Norris) 3:09
You’re So Different (Nat Leslie) 3:02
I Wouldn’t Have Known It (Marie Bryant, Nat Cole) 2:33
Let’s Get Happy (Dan Arons) 2:18
Undecided (Charlie Shavers, Sid Robin) 2:26
‘Taint What You Do (Sy Oliver, James ‘Trummy’ Young) 2:53
Do You Wanna Jump, Children? (Jimmy Van Heusen, Willie Bryant, Victor Selsman) 2:46
Riffin’ in F Minor (Nat Cole) 2:06
Ol’ Man Mose Ain’t Dead (Sammy Cahn, Saul Chaplin) 3:30
Blue Lou (Edgar Sampson, Irving Mills) 3:01
Honey (Seymour Simons, Haven Gillespie, Richard Whiting) 2:11
Russian Lullaby (Irving Berlin) 2:07
Georgie Porgie (unknown) 2:23
The Limp (unknown) 2:52
Snug as a Bug in a Rug (Frank Loesser, Matty Malneck) 2:35
Liebestraum (Franz Liszt) 3:23
Fidgety Joe (Frank Loesser, Matty Malneck) 2:57
Two Against One (L. Wolfe Gilbert, Benny Meroff, Lew Pollack) 3:00
Some Like it Hot (Remo Biondi, Frank Loesser, Gene Krupa) 3:09
Crazy Rhythm (Joseph Meyer, Roger Wolfe Kahn, Irving Caesar) 2:00
Moonglow (Will Hudson, Edgar DeLange, Irving Mills) 2:57
Don’t Let That Moon Get Away (James Monaco, Johnny Burke) 2:45
My Blue Heaven (Walter Donaldson, George Whiting) 1:36
I Was Doing Alright (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) 2:17
I Can’t Get Started ((Vernon Duke, Ira Gershwin) 2:41
Old Man Moon (Hoagy Carmichael) 2:16
Carry Me Back to Old Virginny (James Bland) 2:14

DISC 3
Moon Song (Arthur Johnston, Sam Coslow) 3:09
Baby, Won’t You Please Come Home (Charles Warfield, Clarence Williams) 2:20
Rosetta (Earl Hines, Henri Woode) 2:11
Trompin’ (unknown) 2:46
You’re My Life (unknown) 2:54
Hoy Soy (unknown) 2:33
Take ‘Em (unknown) 2:24
Scategoria (unknown) 2:32
Rhythm Serenade (unknown) 2:35
Rib Town Shuffle (unknown) 2:46
Music’ll Chase Your Blues Away (unknown) 2:01
I’ll Gather Up My Memories (unknown) 3:34
A Fool’s Affair (unknown) 3:34
Jump, Jack, Jump (Charles ‘Lucky’ Roberts) 2:47
I Knew a Time (unknown) 3:05
Mine You’ll Always Be (unknown) 3:19
Doin’ the Bow Wow (unknown) 2:44
Lilla Mae (unknown) 2:18
I Like to Riff (Nat Cole) 2:49
On the Sunny Side of the Street (Jimmy McHugh, Dorothy Fields) 2:55
Black Spider Stomp (Nat Cole, Oscar Moore) 2:40
By the River St. Marie (Harry Warren, Edgar Leslie) 2:25
Slew Foot Joe (unknown) 2:14
1-2-3-4 (Milt Gabler, Gordon Jenkins) 2:09
Crazy ‘Bout Rhythm (unknown) 2:04
Off the Beam (unknown) 2:18
King Cole Blues (unknown) 2:07
Jivin’ with the Notes (unknown) 2:01
Never Mind, Baby (Hal Hampton) 1:45

DISC 4
I’m a Perfect Fool Over You (Sebastian Apollo) 2:38
Lovely Little Person (Al Heath, Buddy Leroux) 2:23
Love Me Sooner (unknown) 2:32
Sentimental Blue (Josh Chamberlain Lawrence) 2:44
Goin’ to Town with Honey (E.E. Waters) 2:21
Syncopated Lullaby (Felix De Cola) 1:51
Falling in and Out of Love (Nat Cole) 1:50
Let’s Do Things (Virginia Ferragamo) 2:01
Jumpy Jitters (Gale Hunt, Jack Green) 1:51
Nothing Ever Happens (Laurence Morgan) 2:35
What’cha Doin’ to My Heart (Tim M. George) 1:37
Bedtime (Nat Cole) 2:45
Honey Hush (Nat Cole) 2:18
French Toast (unknown) 2:15
Vine Street Jump (unknown) 2:43
B Flat (unknown) 2:32
You Send Me (unknown) 2:11
Love Is My Alibi (Nat Cole) 3:123
Pogo Stick Bounce (unknown) 2:19
Whatcha’ Know, Joe? (James ‘Trummy’ Young) 2:36
Sweet Lorraine (Mitchell Parish, Cliff Burwell) 2:57
Honeysuckle Rose (Thomas ‘Fats’ Waller, Andy Razaf) 2:34
Gone with the Draft (Earl Dramin, Wesley Prince, Nat Cole) 2:44
This Side Up (Nat Cole) 2:49
Jumpin’ with the Mop (Nat Cole) 2:26
Jam Man (unknown) 2:05
Let’s Try Again (Biff Hammond, Billy Moore, Jr.) 3:05
Fudge Wudge (unknown) 3:51
Smokey Joe (unknown) 1:58
Windy City Boogie Woogie (unknown) 2:26
Ode to a Wild Clam (unknown) 2:26

DISC 5
Let’s Try Again (Biff Hammond, Billy Moore, Jr.) 3:10
Whatcha’ Know, Joe? (James ‘Trummy’ Young) 2:12
Lazy River (Hoagy Carmichael, Sidney Arodin) 1:46
Georgia on My Mind (Hoagy Carmichael, Stuart Gorrell) 2:45
Rockin’ Chair (Hoagy Carmichael) 3:13
A Little Jive Is Good for You (Ralph Yaw, Ralph Waters) 3:41
You’ve Changed (Carl Fischer, Bill Carey) 3:05
Babs (Fred E. Ahlert, Joe Young) 2:27
Scotchin’ with the Soda (W. Jack Riley) 2:35
Slow Down (Redd Evans) 3:09
Early Morning Blues (Nat Cole) 2:46
The Romany Room Is Jumpin’ (Nat Cole) 2:30
This Will Make You Laugh (Irene Higginbotham) 3:14
Stop! The Red Light’s On (Joseph ‘Taps’ Miller) 2:39
Hit the Ramp (Nat Cole, Oscar Moore) 3:21
I Like to Riff (Nat Cole) 2:48
Call the Police (Nat Cole) 3:05
Are You Fer It? (Nat Cole, Carl Sigman) 3:08
That Ain’t Right (Nat Cole) 3:14
Hit That Jive, Jack (John Alston, Campbell ‘Skeets’ Tolbert) 2:59
Indiana (James F. Hanley, Ballard MacDonald) 4:53
I Can’t Get Started (Vernon Duke, Ira Gershwin) 4:55

DISC 6
Tea for Two (Vincent Youmans, Irving Caesar) 4:47
Body and Soul (Johnny Green, Edward Heyman, Robert Sour, Frank Eyton) 5:13
Vom, Vim, Veedle (Robert Scherman, Frankie Jaxon) 3:02
All for You (Robert Scherman) 3:28
Hip Hip Hooray (Henry Nemo, Milt Ebbins) 2:24
I Know That You Know (Vincent Youmans, Anne Caldwell) 2:10
I’m Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town (William Weldon, Andy Razaf) 3:44
Pitchin’ Up a Boogie (Nat Cole) 3:14
I’m Lost (Otis René) 3:19
Beautiful Moons Ago (Oscar Moore, Nat Cole) 2:27
Let’s Spring One (Otis René) 2:43
Slender, Tender, and Tall (Mike Jackson, Hughie Prince) 2:06
I’ve Found a New Baby (Jack Palmer, Spencer Williams) 4:44
Rosetta (Earl Hines, Henri Woode) 5:10
Sweet Lorraine (Mitchell Parish, Cliff Burwell) 4:56
I Blowed and Gone (Harry ‘Sweets’ Edison) 4:47
Solid Potato Salad (Don Raye, Gene DePaul, Hughie Prince) 2:07
S.T. (Fine, Sweet & Tasty) (Nat Cole) 3:07
Got a Penny (Robert Scherman, Henry May) 2:37
Let’s Pretend (Robert Scherman) 3:18
My Lips Remember Your Kisses (Robert Scherman, Ben Siegel, Henry May) 3:11
I’m an Errand Boy for Rhythm (Nat Cole) 1:51
Straighten Up and Fly Right (Irving Mills, Nat Cole) 2:45

DISC 7
Honey Hush (Nat Cole) 2:47
By the River St. Marie (Harry Warren, Edgar Leslie) 2:12
I Like to Riff (Nat Cole) 2:33
Black Spider Stomp (Nat Cole, Oscar Moore) 2:54
Sweet Lorraine (Mitchell Parish, Cliff Burwell) 3:23
Early Morning Blues (Nat Cole) 2:53
Gone with the Draft (Earl Dramin, Wesley Prince, Nat Cole) 2:22
Trompin’ (unknown) 1:48
Sweet Lorraine (Mitchell Parish, Cliff Burwell) 2:57
Gone with the Draft (Earl Dramin, Wesley Prince, Nat Cole) 2:41
Scotchin’ with the Soda (W. Jack Riley) 2:25
Gone with the Draft (Earl Dramin, Wesley Prince, Nat Cole) 2:28
The Romany Room Is Jumpin’ (Nat Cole) 2:33
Hit That Jive, Jack (John Alston, Campbell ‘Skeets’ Tolbert) 2:16
Beautiful Moons Ago (Oscar Moore, Nat Cole) 3:36
Honeysuckle Rose (Thomas ‘Fats’ Waller, Andy Razaf) 3:20
I Know That You Know (Vincent Youmans, Anne Caldwell) 2:53
Solid Potato Salad (Don Raye, Gene DePaul, Hughie Prince) 2:14
My Lips Remember Your Kisses (Robert Scherman, Ben Siegel, Henry May) 3:07
Straighten Up and Fly Right (Irving Mills, Nat Cole) 2:52


10LP Set Track Listing

Side 1A (A)
Honey Hush (Nat Cole) 2:52
Stompin’ at the Panama (Skoller’s Shuffle) (Nat Cole) 2:59
Bedtime (Sleepy Moan) (Nat Cole) 2:54
Thunder (Nat Cole) 2:50
Mutiny in the Nursery (Johnny Mercer) 2:52
D.R Jones (Harold Rome) 3:10
The Sheik of Araby ((Ted Snyder, Francis Wheeler, Harry B. Smith) 2:17
The Blue Danube (Johan Strauss II) 2:50
Button, Button (Clay A. Boland, Bickley ‘Bix’ Reichner) 2:52

Side 1B (B)
Jingle Bells (J.S. Pierpont) 2:34
Swanee River (Stephen Foster) 2:28
With Plenty of Money and You (Harry Warren, Al Dubin) 2:15
Don’t Blame Me ((Jimmy McHugh, Dorothy Fields) 2:26
Lullaby in Rhythm (Edgar Sampson, Walter Hirsch, Clarence Profit, Benny Goodman) 2:48
Dark Rapture (Edgar Sampson, Manny Kurtz, Benny Goodman) 3:13
The Wiggly Walk (Al Jacobs, Dave Oppenheim, Jack Palmer) 2:52
Flea Hop (Al Jacobs, Dave Oppenheim, Jack Palmer) 2:43
Chopsticks (Arthur De Lulli) 2:44
Patty Cake, Patty Cake (Thomas ‘Fats’ Waller, Andy Razaf, J. C. Johnson) 2:43

Side 2A (C)
Blue Skies (Irving Berlin) 2:09
Liza (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin, Gus Kahn) 2:58
Three Blind Mice (Traditional) 2:08
Caravan (Duke Ellington, Juan Tizol, Irving Mills) 2:17
There’s no Anesthetic for Love (Marshall Walker) 3:15
Dixie Jamboree (Lyle Griffin, Charles Callender) 3:04
Ta-De-Ah (Betty Johnson, Charlie Bourne) 2:39
Riffin’ at the Bar-B-Q (Nat Cole) 2:05
Harlem Swing (Bonnie Lake) 2:30
I Lost Control of Myself (Irwin ‘Hap’ Kaufman, Nat Cole) 3:16

Side 2B (D)
The Land of Make Believe (Betty Johnson, Charlie Bourne) 2:52
That Please-be-Mine-able Feeling (Reginald Sloan) 2:15
Dancing in the Street (Arthur Norris) 3:09
You’re So Different (Nat Leslie) 3:02
I Wouldn’t Have Known It (Marie Bryant, Nat Cole) 2:33
Let’s Get Happy (Dan Arons) 2:18
Undecided (Charlie Shavers, Sid Robin) 2:26
‘Taint What You Do (Sy Oliver, James ‘Trummy’ Young) 2:53
Do You Wanna Jump, Children? (Jimmy Van Heusen, Willie Bryant, Victor Selsman) 2:46
Riffin’ in F Minor (Nat Cole) 2:06

Side 3A (E)
Ol’ Man Mose Ain’t Dead (Sammy Cahn, Saul Chaplin) 3:30
Blue Lou (Edgar Sampson, Irving Mills) 3:01
Honey (Seymour Simons, Haven Gillespie, Richard Whiting) 2:11
Russian Lullaby (Irving Berlin) 2:07
Georgie Porgie (unknown) 2:23
The Limp (unknown) 2:52
Snug as a Bug in a Rug (Frank Loesser, Matty Malneck) 2:35
Liebestraum (Franz Liszt) 3:23
Fidgety Joe (Frank Loesser, Matty Malneck) 2:57

Side 3B (F)
Two Against One (L. Wolfe Gilbert, Benny Meroff, Lew Pollack) 3:00
Some Like it Hot (Remo Biondi, Frank Loesser, Gene Krupa) 3:09
Crazy Rhythm (Joseph Meyer, Roger Wolfe Kahn, Irving Caesar) 2:00
Moonglow (Will Hudson, Edgar DeLange, Irving Mills) 2:57
Don’t Let That Moon Get Away (James Monaco, Johnny Burke) 2:45
My Blue Heaven (Walter Donaldson, George Whiting) 1:36
I Was Doing Alright (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) 2:17
I Can’t Get Started ((Vernon Duke, Ira Gershwin) 2:41
Old Man Moon (Hoagy Carmichael) 2:16
Carry Me Back to Old Virginny (James Bland) 2:14

Side 4A (G)
Moon Song (Arthur Johnston, Sam Coslow) 3:09
Baby, Won’t You Please Come Home (Charles Warfield, Clarence Williams) 2:20
Rosetta (Earl Hines, Henri Woode) 2:11
Trompin’ (unknown) 2:46
You’re My Life (unknown) 2:54
Hoy Soy (unknown) 2:33
Take ‘Em (unknown) 2:24
Scategoria (unknown) 2:32
Rhythm Serenade (unknown) 2:35
Rib Town Shuffle (unknown) 2:46

Side 4B (H)
Music’ll Chase Your Blues Away (unknown) 2:01
I’ll Gather Up My Memories (unknown) 3:34
A Fool’s Affair (unknown) 3:34
Jump, Jack, Jump (Charles ‘Lucky’ Roberts) 2:47
I Knew a Time (unknown) 3:05
Mine You’ll Always Be (unknown) 3:19
Doin’ the Bow Wow (unknown) 2:44
Lilla Mae (unknown) 2:18

Side 5A (I)
I Like to Riff (Nat Cole) 2:49
On the Sunny Side of the Street (Jimmy McHugh, Dorothy Fields) 2:55
Black Spider Stomp (Nat Cole, Oscar Moore) 2:40
By the River St. Marie (Harry Warren, Edgar Leslie) 2:25
Slew Foot Joe (unknown) 2:14
1-2-3-4 (Milt Gabler, Gordon Jenkins) 2:09
Crazy ‘Bout Rhythm (unknown) 2:04
Off the Beam (unknown) 2:18
King Cole Blues (unknown) 2:07
Jivin’ With the Notes (unknown) 2:01
Never Mind, Baby (Hal Hampton) 1:45

Side 5B (J)
I’m a Perfect Fool Over You (Sebastian Apollo) 2:38
Lovely Little Person (Al Heath, Buddy Leroux) 2:23
Love Me Sooner (unknown) 2:32
Sentimental Blue (Josh Chamberlain Lawrence) 2:44
Goin’ to Town with Honey (E.E. Waters) 2:21
Syncopated Lullaby (Felix De Cola) 1:51
Falling in and Out of Love (Nat Cole) 1:50
Let’s Do Things (Virginia Ferragamo) 2:01
Jumpy Jitters (Gale Hunt, Jack Green) 1:51
Nothing Ever Happens (Laurence Morgan) 2:35
What’cha Doin’ to My Heart (Tim M. George) 1:37

Side 6A (K)

Bedtime (Nat Cole) 2:45
Honey Hush (Nat Cole) 2:18
French Toast (unknown) 2:15
Vine Street Jump (unknown) 2:43
B Flat (unknown) 2:32
You Send Me (unknown) 2:11
Love is My Alibi (Nat Cole) 3:123
Pogo Stick Bounce (unknown) 2:19
Whatcha’ Know, Joe? (James ‘Trummy’ Young) 2:36
Sweet Lorraine (Mitchell Parish, Cliff Burwell) 2:57

Side 6B (L)
Honeysuckle Rose (Thomas ‘Fats’ Waller, Andy Razaf) 2:34
Gone with the Draft (Earl Dramin, Wesley Prince, Nat Cole) 2:44
This Side Up (Nat Cole) 2:49
Jumpin’ with the Mop (Nat Cole) 2:26
Jam Man (unknown) 2:05
Let’s Try Again (Biff Hammond, Billy Moore, Jr.) 3:05
Fudge Wudge (unknown) 3:51
Smokey Joe (unknown) 1:58
Windy City Boogie Woogie (unknown) 2:26
Ode to a Wild Clam (unknown) 2:26

Side 7A (M)
Let’s Try Again (Biff Hammond, Billy Moore, Jr.) 3:10
Whatcha’ Know, Joe? (James ‘Trummy’ Young) 2:12
Lazy River (Hoagy Carmichael, Sidney Arodin) 1:46
Georgia on My Mind (Hoagy Carmichael, Stuart Gorrell) 2:45
Rockin Chair (Hoagy Carmichael) 3:13
A Little Jive is Good for You (Ralph Yaw, Ralph Waters) 3:41
You’ve Changed (Carl Fischer, Bill Carey) 3:05

Side 7B (N)
Babs (Fred E. Ahlert, Joe Young) 2:27
Scotchin’ with the Soda (W. Jack Riley) 2:35
Slow Down (Redd Evans) 3:09
Early Morning Blues (Nat Cole) 2:46
The Romany Room is Jumpin’ (Nat Cole) 2:30
This Will Make You Laugh (Irene Higginbotham) 3:14
Stop! The Red Light’s On (Joseph ‘Taps’ Miller) 2:39
Hit the Ramp (Nat Cole, Oscar Moore) 3:21
I Like to Riff (Nat Cole) 2:48

Side 8A (O)
Call the Police (Nat Cole) 3:05
Are You Fer It? (Nat Cole, Carl Sigman) 3:08
That Ain’t Right (Nat Cole) 3:14
Hit That Jive, Jack (John Alston, Campbell ‘Skeets’ Tolbert) 2:59
Indiana (James F. Hanley, Ballard MacDonald) 4:53
I Can’t Get Started (Vernon Duke, Ira Gershwin) 4:55

Side 8B (P)
Tea for Two (Vincent Youmans, Irving Caesar) 4:47
Body and Soul (Johnny Green, Edward Heyman, Robert Sour, Frank Eyton) 5:13
Vom, Vim, Veedle (Robert Scherman, Frankie Jaxon) 3:02
All for You (Robert Scherman) 3:28
Hip, Hip, Hooray (Henry Nemo, Milt Ebbins) 2:24
I Know That You Know (Vincent Youmans, Anne Caldwell) 2:10
I’m Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town (William Weldon, Andy Razaf) 3:44

Side 9A (Q)

Pitchin’ Up a Boogie (Nat Cole) 3:14
I’m Lost (Otis René) 3:19
Beautiful Moons Ago (Oscar Moore, Nat Cole) 2:27
Let’s Spring One (Otis René) 2:43
Slender, Tender, and Tall (Mike Jackson, Hughie Prince) 2:06
I’ve Found a New Baby (Jack Palmer, Spencer Williams) 4:44
Rosetta (Earl Hines, Henri Woode) 5:10

Side 9B (R)
Sweet Lorraine (Mitchell Parish, Cliff Burwell) 4:56
I Blowed and Gone (Harry ‘Sweets’ Edison) 4:47
Solid Potato Salad (Don Raye, Gene DePaul, Hughie Prince) 2:07
S.T. (Fine, Sweet & Tasty) (Nat Cole) 3:07
Got a Penny (Robert Scherman, Henry May) 2:37
Let’s Pretend (Robert Scherman) 3:18
My Lips Remember Your Kisses (Robert Scherman, Ben Siegel, Henry May) 3:11
I’m an Errand Boy for Rhythm (Nat Cole) 1:51
Straighten up and Fly Right (Irving Mills, Nat Cole) 2:45

Side 10A (S)
Honey Hush (Nat Cole) 2:47
By the River St. Marie (Harry Warren, Edgar Leslie) 2:12
I Like to Riff (Nat Cole) 2:33
Black Spider Stomp (Nat Cole, Oscar Moore) 2:54
Sweet Lorraine (Mitchell Parish, Cliff Burwell) 3:23
Early Morning Blues (Nat Cole) 2:53
Gone with the Draft (Earl Dramin, Wesley Prince, Nat Cole) 2:22
Trompin’ (unknown) 1:48
Sweet Lorraine (Mitchell Parish, Cliff Burwell) 2:57
Gone with the Draft (Earl Dramin, Wesley Prince, Nat Cole) 2:41

Side 10B (T)
Scotchin’ with the Soda (W. Jack Riley) 2:25
Gone with the Draft (Earl Dramin, Wesley Prince, Nat Cole) 2:28
The Romany Room is Jumpin’ (Nat Cole) 2:33
Hit That Jive, Jack (John Alston, Campbell ‘Skeets’ Tolbert) 2:16
Beautiful Moons Ago (Oscar Moore, Nat Cole) 3:36
Honeysuckle Rose (Thomas ‘Fats’ Waller, Andy Razaf) 3:20
I Know That You Know (Vincent Youmans, Anne Caldwell) 2:53
Solid Potato Salad (Don Raye, Gene DePaul, Hughie Prince) 2:14
My Lips Remember Your Kisses (Robert Scherman, Ben Siegel, Henry May) 3:07
Straighten up and Fly Right (Irving Mills, Nat Cole) 2:52